1954 Living room and Kitchen decorated for ChristmasThe Richfield History Center offers a glimpse into the past at Christmas time. This year a gallery was transformed into a living room and kitchen vignette from 1954, all decked out for Christmas. It is the follow up from last year’s 1977 exhibit. The exhibit consists of center-owned pieces and 20 borrowed items from Richfield resident and avid collector, Gary Anderson. He was 10 years old in 1954 and recalls that year to be his apex Christmas experience.

The exhibit is 15’ x 15’ featuring an aluminum Christmas tree, metal doll house, Prince Valiant castle and knights set, living room bowling game, Holiday knick-knacks and bric-a-brac, period furniture, clothes washer with wringer, wooden snow sled, 8mm movie camera and projector, refrigerator, Christmas cards and more.

On a video screen were television programs radio clips and television commercials from 1954. I saw two cigarette commercials with Santa wishing everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy Smoking!

The year marks an iconic time for Richfield. “The suburbs were going up and it was the modern thing to do to move here, where a family with young kids could afford to have a house and a yard,” said Jodi Larson, director of the History Center. (ref.– Star Tribune)

The Richfield Historical Society was formed in 1967 to preserve and share the Bartholomew House, the first house in Richfield. In 2005, this historic Richfield house was joined by the History Center. The exhibit runs through Jan 5.

More information about the exhibit and hours can be found at http://www.richfieldhistory.org/

A more detailed article can be found at http://www.startribune.com/local/west/183601881.html?refer=y

2 thoughts on “1954 Christmas at the Richfield History Museum

  1. What a fun rendition of a Christmas past. Richfield is the perfect place to have a 1954 exhibit. With its close proximity to Minneapolis, the suburb was transformed from a community of farming to housing at that time. Convenient living during the 50’s also changed the way Americans eat. The convenience foods that became popular then are still mainstays today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *